2

The Ultimate List of Emotions

Last Updated on

At some point, you may have wondered why you have emotions.

Why do you feel happy? Why do you feel sad? Why do you experience every emotion in between?

Sometimes, it seems easier not to feel at all — especially if you’re experiencing emotions like anger, fear, and despair.

After all, it’s painful to have “bad” feelings.

Regardless, emotions (whether positive or negative) are important in a lot of ways.

They play a vital role in how we think and behave, compelling us to take action and impacting our daily decisions.

There are three essential components of an emotion:

1. The subjective component which is how we experience the emotion.

2. The physiological component which involves how our bodies react to the emotion.

3. The expressive component or how we behave in response to the emotion.

These three elements can play a role in the function and purpose of our emotional responses.

But why exactly do we experience emotions? What role do they serve?

Before we answer these questions, let's explore the reason this list of emotions can be useful for you.

Why do we need feeling words?

The words we use to describe emotions help us identify and communicate the various components of a feeling.

Sometimes emotions are so intense or confusing or overwhelming that we're at a loss for how to express them or even identify them.

Feeling words may not entirely reflect the depth and breadth of our inner worlds, but they are the best tools we have for harnessing our feelings, understanding them, and sharing them with others.

They can also help us better understand and empathize with others.

A list of feeling words can be the perfect resource when:

  • You can't identify exactly what you are feeling and need the right word to encapsulate it.
  • You want to communicate with someone (verbally or in writing) what you are feeling.
  • You are telling a story, writing a book/poem/play/blog/song and need just the right word.
  • You want to improve your emotional intelligence to better understand yourself and others.

Recognizing, identifying, and sharing emotions is essential to our self-awareness and personal growth. It's essential for healthy relationships in our personal and professional lives.

young man in large crowd singing list of emotions

Emotions are capricious and fickle. Words harness emotions so that we can interpret and share them.

You may remember saying to your own children when they were flooded with emotion, “Use your words.” Using words can help children and adults alike prevent conflict, misunderstandings, and hurt feelings.

When our physical expressions of emotion betray us, words can come to the rescue with their solid and practical presence.

What are emotions and why do we need them?

For one, they let you know what to do in a given situation.

They can help you avoid danger or a potential threat.

If your heart jumps as soon as your car swerves to the side, that’s your cue to tighten your grip on the wheel and steer in the right direction.

  • Emotions also motivate you to take action. If your abusive relationship has been making you increasingly angry, that’s your cue to set boundaries (or, in the worst-case scenario, get out of the relationship).
  • Emotions also clue you in on your likes and dislikes. If you feel angry because your colleague is taking credit for your hard work, you may want to sign the projects you send your boss next time.
  • Emotions also help others to understand you and what you feel. Your expressions, body language, and words all reflect your inner world to those around you.
  • Emotions are crucial to effective communication. You can let someone know whether their behavior is acceptable by displaying a specific nonverbal cue. By the same token, others can let you know how they feel using similar nonverbal cues.

Granted, emotions manifest differently for different people. Some may show enthusiasm for sports but not video games, while others may be the opposite.

Some may be genuinely scared of horror movies, while others may view the same as pure entertainment.

In any case, being aware of how you feel at any time is a vital skill. When you’re able to put a name to an emotion before it gets the better of you, your feelings and emotions can serve as a guide (rather than a hindrance) to living your daily life.

To start developing this skill, grab a pen and paper or some other note-taking device, and look at the list of emotions below.

Choose one word from the emotions list that describes how you feel right now. Write the word down and reflect on it.

Why do you feel that way right now?


Related: 10 Ways To Cultivate Emotional Maturity


What do you think is the best course of action given emotions and feelings?

Is it the right course of action from a logical perspective?

Here is the ultimate list of emotions to help you identify your feelings:

 

Absorbed
Abhorrence
Acceptance
Admiration
Adoration
Adrift
Aching
Affection
Afraid
Agitated
Agony
Aggravated
Alarm
Alert
Alienated
Alive
Alone
Amazed
Amused
Anger
Angst
Animated
Animosity
Animus
Annoyed
Antagonistic
Anticipation
Antipathy
Antsy
Anxiety
Apathetic
Apologetic
Appalled
Appreciative
Apprehensive
Ardor
Arousal
Astonishment
Astounded
Attachment
Attraction
Aversion
Awe
Awkward
Baffled
Bashful
Befuddled
Bemused
Betrayed
Bewildered
Bitter
Blessed
Bliss
Blithe
Blue
Bold
Bonhomie
Boredom
Bothered
Bouncy
Brave
Breathless
Brooding
Bubbly
Buoyant
Burning
Calm
Captivated
Carefree
Caring
Cautious
Certain
Chagrin
Challenged
Chary
Cheerful
Choked
Choleric
Clueless
Cocky
Cold
Collected
Comfortable
Commiseration
Committed
Compassionate
Complacent
Complaisance
Composed
Compunction
Confused
Courage
Concerned
Confident
Conflicted
Consternation
Contemplative
Contempt
Contentment
Contrition
Cordial
Cowardly
Crafty
Cranky
Craving
Crestfallen
Cross
Cruel
Crummy
Crushed
Curious
Cynical
Defeated
Dejection
Delectation
Delighted
Delirious
Denial
Derisive
Desire
Desolation
Despair
Despondent
Detached
Determined
Detestation
Devastated
Devotion
Disappointed
Disbelief
Disdain
Disgruntled
Disgust
Disillusioned
Disinterested
Dismay
Distaste
Distracted
Distress
Disturbed
Doleful
Dopey
Doubtful
Down
Downcast
Drained
Dread
Dubious
Dumbfounded
Eager
Earnest
Ease
Ebullient
Ecstatic
Edgy
Elated
Embarrassment
Empathic
Empty
Enchantment
Energetic
Engrossed
Enjoyment
Enlightenment
Enmity
Entertainment
Enthralled
Enthusiasm
Envy
Euphoria
Exasperated
Excitement
Excluded
Exhausted
Exhilaration
Expectant
Exuberant
Fanatical
Fascinated
Fatigued
Feisty
Felicitous
Fervor
Flabbergasted
Floored
Fondness
Foolish
Foreboding
Fortunate
Frazzled
Free
Fretful
Frightened
Frustrated
Fulfilled
Furious
Genial
Giddy
Glad
Gleeful
Gloomy
Goofy
Gratified
Grateful
Greedy
Grief
Groggy
Grudging
Guarded
Guilt
Gung-ho
Gusto
Hankering
Happy
Harassed
Hatred
Heartache
Heartbroken
Helpless
Hesitant
Hollow
Homesick
Hopeful
Horrified
Hostile
Humiliated
Humored
Hurt
Hyper
Hysterical
Impatient
Incensed
Indifferent
Indignant
Infatuated
Inferior
Inspired
Intense
Interested
Intimacy
Intimidated
Intoxicated
Intrigued
Introspective
Invigorated
Irascible
Ire
Irritated
Isolated
Jaded
Jealous
Jittery
Jocular
Jocund
Jolly
Jovial
Joy
Jubilant
Jumpy
Keen
Lazy
Left out
Lethargic
Liberation
Lighthearted
Liking
Listless
Lively
Lonely
Longing
Lost
Love
Lucky
Lust
Mad
Meditative
Melancholic
Mellow
Merry
Miffed
Mirth
Mischievous
Miserable
Mollified
Mortified
Motivated
Mournful
Moved
Mystified
Nasty
Nauseous
Needy
Nervous
Neutral
Nonplussed
Nostalgic
Numb
Obsessed
Offended
Optimistic
Outrage
Overwhelmed
Pacified
Pain
Panic
Paranoid
Passion
Pathetic
Peaceful
Peevish
Pensive
Perky
Perplexed
Perturbed
Pessimistic
Petrified
Petty
Petulant
Phlegmatic
Pity
Playful
Pleasure
Positive
Possessive
Powerful
Powerless
Preoccupied
Protective
Proud
Psyched
Pumped
Puzzled
Quizzical
Rage
Rapture
Rattled
Reassured
Receptive
Reflective
Regret
Relaxed
Relief
Relish
Reluctance
Remorse
Repugnance
Resentment
Resignation
Restless
Revolted
Sad
Sanguine
Satisfied
Scandalized
Scorn
Secure
Self-Conscious
Selfish
Sensual
Sensitive
Serendipitous
Serene
Settled
Shaken
Shame
Sheepish
Shock
Shy
Sick
Silly
Sincere
Skeptical
Sluggish
Smug
Snappy
Solemn
Solicitous
Somber
Sore
Sorrow
Sorry
Sour
Speechless
Spiteful
Sprightly
Stirred
Stressed
Strong
Stung
Stunned
Stupefied
Submissive
Succor
Suffering
Suffocated
Sullen
Sunny
Superior
Sure
Surprised
Startled
Sympathy
Tenderness
Tense
Terror
Testy
Tetchy
Thankful
Thirst
Thoughtful
Thrill
Timid
Tired
Titillation
Tormented
Torn
Torture
Touched
Traumatized
Tranquil
Trepidation
Triumphant
Troubled
Trust
Twitchy
Upbeat
Upset
Uptight
Vehement
Vexation
Vigilant
Vindication
Vindictive
Warmth
Wary
Weak
Weary
Welcome
Woe
Wonder
Woozy
Worry
Wrath
Wretched
Yearning
Zeal
Zest

Read the ultimate list of emotions. You will be surprised at the number of emotions that we can all experience as human beings.

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 2 comments
  • Victor L Guerrero

    Should people that cannot show a lot of emotions be public educators?

    Reply
      River Song

      Hi Victor,

      I would love to answer your question, however they way you worded it leaves me a bit perplexed. I’ll try, none the less!

      By asking “SHOULD” they be public educators, in my opinion, almost sounds like you already have a strong opinion about whether they should, or should not. I would like you to think about whether they COULD be a good public educator or not. I believe they most definitely COULD be a GREAT public educator, if they possess the knowledge and expertise to teach the subject they are applying for. That person may not show many emotions to outside world, but he/she still has all the same emotions you and I have. I believe that person would be rational, methodical, and really think before they act, or react. Often in a school setting, especially for young, say 12 to 18 year old students, those years are filled with emotions! Puberty starts it all – for both young women AND young men. They are all trying to fit in, find “their” place in school, and later in life. Deep friendships form, dating begins, jealousies and anger, frustration, competition, both academically and “romantically” comes to the forefront. In these often confusing and complex times, emotions – both good, and bad flare. In such situations, if an educator HAS to intervene, I would MUCH prefer that educator to have and keep, a very level head! It is far too easy to get drawn into all the school age “drama”, so yes, indeed, HIRE, PLEASE HIRE, that cool, calm, emotionally stable educator!!

      Reply
  • Leave a Reply: